Leek, Potato and Caramelised Fennel Soup


On a trip to the snow earlier this year we stopped in at a café for some lunch. Piper, my daughter ordered this soup and it has been a staple in our house ever since. She loved it so much she even requested it for her birthday dinner meal this year. Continue reading →

Mushroom and Walnut Pate


Lately we’ve been counting mushroom species in the bush where we live and talking about how all this diversity tells us that the forest is healthy and strong.

It’s similar with us really. Mushrooms have incredibly powerful immune enhancing properties. There has been a lot of research on particular varieties such as codonopsis and shitake but the humble button or slightly more glamorous swiss-brown mushroom also have enzymes which stimulate the immune response.

Continue reading →

Apple and Rhubarb Crumble


A perfect wintery dessert. The crumble topping is made using ground almonds, flaxseeds and oats for a nutrient dense whack of great protein, good essential fatty acids and fibre. This tops warm and delicious stewed apple and rhubarb. The extra bonus is it makes a fabulous winter breakfast and if you can have nuts at school then you can warm it and pop it in the Thermos for lunch for the kids. Delish! Continue reading →

All you need to know about Cooking Dried Beans & Legumes


Beans and legumes (lentils, chick peas, cannellini beans) are excellent sources of protein and fibre. Cooking dried beans can take some time, but soaking them first will dramatically reduce the cooking time. Soak them during the day leading up to an evening meal, or overnight to cook the next day. Lentils, split peas and mung beans do not need soaking prior to cooking, but any other pulse needs to be soaked. Soaking beans/legumes can ferment in hot weather, so if it is very warm, put the soaking beans in the fridge.

Continue reading →

Grated Beetroot Salad

Lauren-Burns-Beetroot- Salad

Beetroot is a wonderful vegetable rich in folic acid, manganese, potassium and fibre. Beetroots have a reputation for being a blood tonic, with their bright blood red colour it’s an easy one to remember. It’s actually the nitrates found in beetroot that have shown to reduce blood pressure. This is done by way of nitric oxide which is a key regulator in vascular integrity. Don’t discard the leaves as they are nutritious too! Beet greens are rich in calcium, iron and vitamin A and C.

Continue reading →